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Why Are Professional Photographers So Expensive?

This is a question even I have been asked in the short time that I have been in business.  People always wonder why professional photographers are so expensive.  I mean, after all, don’t they just “take” a picture?  Everyone today has a camera of some kind, even it is their cell phone.  So photography is just pushing the shutter button, right?

I came across this article last week that is on this very topic.  It is written by a photographer in San Diego named Shawn Richter.  Shawn owns Caught On Film Photography.  Please understand, I did not write this article.  It is as well written as an article on this subject can be.  I emailed Shawn last week and asked permission to post his article on my blog.  Graciously, he gave me permission.  In his email reply to me, he wrote, “Thanks for the email, please be my guest, go ahead and use the article.  We can only hope to educate people one by one.”   Here is his article in its entirety:

“Why are Professional Photographers so expensive?
This article has been very well received by the photography community, and is published in the December 2009 edition of Professional Photographer Magazine.

In this digital age where everyone has cameras, scanners, and home “photo printers,” we hear this all the time: How do professional (or personal) photographers charge $X for an 8×10 when they cost just $1.50 at the drugstore? Simply put, the customer is not just paying for the actual photograph; they’re paying for time and expertise.

The average one-hour portrait session

First, let’s look at the actual work involved:

  • Travel to the session
  • Setup, preparation, talking to the client, etc.
  • Shoot the photos
  • Travel from the session
  • Load images onto a computer
  • Back up the files on an external drive
  • 2 – 4 hours of Adobe® Photoshop® time, including cropping, contrast, color, sharpening, and backing up edited photographs. Proof photos are also ordered.
  • 2 – 3 hours to talk to the client, answer questions, receive order and payment, order their prints, receive and verify prints, package prints, schedule shipment, and ship.
  • Possibly meet clients at the studio to review photos and place order. Meeting and travel time average 2 hours.

You can see how a one-hour session easily turns into an eight-hour day or more from start to finish. So when you see a personal photographer charging a $200 session fee for a one-hour photo shoot, the client is NOT paying them $200 per hour.

The eight-hour wedding

A wedding photographer typically meets with the bride and groom several times before and after the wedding. And it’s not uncommon to end up with 1,000 – 2,000 photos, much more than a portrait session. Many photographers spend 40-60 hours working on one eight-hour wedding if you look at the time that is truly involved. Again, when a wedding photographer charges $4,000 for eight hours of coverage, clients are NOT paying them $500 an hour!

(Don’t forget that the photographer runs the wedding day to some extent. A comfortable, confident wedding photographer can make a wedding day go more smoothly.)

The expertise and cost of doing business

Shooting professional photography is a skill acquired through years of experience. Even though a DSLR now costs under $1,000, taking professional portraits involves much more than a nice camera.

Most personal photographers take years to go from buying their first camera to making money with photography. In addition to learning how to use the camera, there is a mountain of other equipment and software programs used to edit and print photographs, run a website, etc. And don’t forget backdrops, props, rent, utilities, insurance, etc!

In addition to the financial investment, photographers actually have to have people skills to make subjects comfortable in front of the camera. Posing people to look their best is a skill by itself. You could argue that posing is a more important skill than actually knowing how to use the camera. A poorly exposed photo can be saved, but a badly posed photo cannot.

The chain store photo studio

Chain stores do have their place. For a very cheap price you can run in, shoot some quick photos, and be done with it. But you get what you pay for.

Consider the time and effort that a personal photographer puts into photographs, compared to a chain store. Store sessions last just a few minutes, while a personal photographer takes the time to get to know the people, makes them comfortable, makes them laugh. If a baby is crying at a chain store, they often don’t have the time (or the patience) to wait because everyone is in a hurry.

The truth is that many chain store studios lose money. In fact, Wal-Mart closed 500 of their portrait studios in 2007 because of the financial drain. What the chain stores bank on is a client coming in for quick, cheap photos…and while there, spending $200 on other items. They are there to get you in the door.

The real deal

Professional, personal photographers are just that—professionals. No different than a mechanic, dentist, doctor, or electrician. But a personal photographer often becomes a friend, someone who documents a family for generations with professional, personal photographs of cherished memories.

Maybe we need to help clients look at it this way: A pair of scissors costs $1.50 at the drugstore. Still, most people will gladly pay a lot more to hire a professional hair dresser to cut their hair.

The added attention and quality that a personal photographer gives is worth every penny.

Conclusion

We hope that those who have taken the time to read this page will have a better understanding of why professional photographs, created by a Personal Photographer are so expensive.

Thank you for taking the time to read this.

Shawn, Pamela and Gavin Richter – cofphoto@aol.com

Our website – Caught on Film Photography

Our photography fourm – Learning Digital Photography Together”

 

I hope this helped to answer any questions you may have as to why professional photographers charge so much.  There is much more to photography than “taking” a picture, or several pictures.  A chimpanzee can take pictures.  But it takes countless hours of training, studying, and learning, not to mention a good chunk of change for quality equipment.  Keep in mind, an expensive camera a photographer does not make.  That is, just because someone has a big expensive camera does not mean that they have spent hundreds of hours learning and studying the craft.  Photography is not just taking pictures; it is a specialized career field!


Check out MCP Actions!

I just wanted to take a little bit of time to share a great photographic resource I’ve come across.  I shared a couple of months ago some things that Jodi has on her blog.  She has many different resources, including some great free actions for Photoshop.  I use her Facebook actions and High Definition sharpening actions all the time.  Her new Fusion set looks pretty good.  I’ve had the chance to try the Mini-Fusion set that she gave away.  She offers many actions that, from what I’ve seen, do some wonderful things.  If you’re not familiar with actions, they are a group of steps to accomplish a certain action in Photoshop that ultimately save a lot of time.  Keep in mind, you don’t have to be a professional photographer to use Jodi’s actions.  But you do have to have Photoshop CS* or Elements.

Not only does she offer some great Photoshop actions, she posts many fabulous tutorials and articles to help the photographer of any level!  Many of the posts on the MCP Actions blog are written by many talented guest bloggers.  I wanted to highlight my favorite series from her blog thus far.  It would be hard to pick a favorite.  Not too long ago, she had a post on shooting the moon that was very helpful.  But my favorite has to be the 2-part series on Night Photography that was written by Tricia Krefetz.  Tricia owns the Click. Capture. Create. Photography in Boca Raton, FL.  You can follow Tricia on Facebook or check out her website.

Tricia’s 2-part article on night photography was very helpful to me, as that has been a challenging area for me for some time.  I encourage you to read her posts as well.  Read Part 1 and Part 2 to get a bunch of great info and help on shooting at night!

If I were you, and if you have any interest in photography at all, go to Jodi’s MCP Actions blog.  Stop by her Facebook page as well, as she will keep you up to date with all the happenings at MCP Actions.  Let me know if you find her resources and blog posts as wondrously helpful as I do!


Gilbert Family

I had the opportunity to shoot family portraits for the Gilbert family.  All they wanted was some simple shots, nothing real fancy.  The weather didn’t quite cooperate, but does add Montana “character” to the images.  These are just a few of the shots, but all that I’m going to get to today.


© Eric Brown and Panther Photography, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Eric Brown and Panther Photography with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


Sheridan Boys at Lincoln 12-10-10

The Sheridan Panthers kicked off their season at the Tip-Off Tournament held in Philipsburg.  Their first game was against the Lincoln Lynx.  Let’s just say it was a bit of a rough start for the guys.  For the most part, they are a new team, returning only 3 players from last year’s varsity team.  But they played hard throughout the game, never giving up!

I know they will play much better in the rest of their games!  They have a lot of potential and may be highly underrated in the conference this year.  Here are a few images from that game.

© Eric Brown and Panther Photography, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Eric Brown and Panther Photography with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


Sheridan HS Boys Basketball Schedule Poster

I have finally finished the schedule poster for the Sheridan HS boys basketball team!  Let me tell you, it wasn’t easy.  Many hours over the past couple of weeks were put into this, but I am very happy with how it came out.  I think the theme of the poster fits the guys very much!

This and any of my schedule posters are available for sale.  They are $40 each, or 2 for $60.  Contact me to find out more or to place your order.  They will only be available for a limited time, so get them while you can!

© Eric Brown and Panther Photography, 2010. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Eric Brown and Panther Photography with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.